EPA’s fondness for high-end furniture costs taxpayers $92 million

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Better hope none of the furniture was made from tropical hardwood. But given the prices paid for some of this stuff how could it not be?

I really think that with stories like this there is a good bit of envy of people in the private sector. I once talked with a senior manager in government who lamented that given the number of people he managed he should be paid more. In the private sector a manager on his level might make 3 times as much. But I argued that in the private sector there was more risk and that since this fellow was employed by the taxpayers his pay was factored using a fundamentally different equation.

Let’s just say we agreed to disagree.

And I am sure some people at the EPA look at the offices of some of the companies they regulate and think, “Hey, you know I deserve an $800 pencil holder too. I’m as smart as they are. I went to the right schools.”

The problem is it’s the taxpayer’s money which must go to such luxuries for the bureaucrats, not company money, and as such $800 pencil holders are wholly inappropriate.

(From The Washington Times)

“The amount of money that [EPA’s office of criminal enforcement, forensics and training] wastes is mind-boggling,” one employee was quoted as saying in the report, adding that the ability of agents to investigate violations is negatively affected by a number of wasteful practices, including “moving and remodeling offices/buying fancy new furniture for the benefit of a favored few.”

Among the thousands of contracts for “household” and office furniture were a hexagonal table ($5,539), hickory chairs ($6,391), a “Galerie lounge chair” with “Galerie settee” ($2,641 for the set), and a pencil drawer ($813.57).

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