Eric Schneiderman’s legalized shakedowns made him the 6th Mafia family of New York

Whoa, now that is a headline. It’s not our’s, it’s The Examiner’s.

(From The Washington Examiner)

The Schneiderman Outfit was a $5 billion operation, whose extortion and racketeering sent many honest New Yorkers and their businesses into hiding down in Florida or North Carolina. Unlike the Gambino victims of old, the victims of the Schneiderman gang cannot be saved through a federal victim protection program based in Utah. They will be followed no matter where they flee (though you may want to consider a lovely Central Asian goat farm in extradition-free Uzbekistan). In fact, the victims of this mob family have little to no legal recourse whatsoever. Their only option is to pay the kickback.

How can this be, you may be asking? Where is the justice system? Where is due process? Well, all those pesky tidbits of our Bill of Rights went straight out the door when our wily state legislators in Albany passed the extraordinary and far-reaching Martin Act.

If you haven’t picked up on this by now, the Pine Street Schneiderman Boys are a tongue-in-cheek reference to the office of the recently disgraced former New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman.

Schneiderman (the accused sexual abuser, alcoholic, and hypocrite) is the sort of man Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., and many other prominent Democrats once heralded as “a fighter on behalf of women.” He originally became notorious not for running an actual Mafia family, but something very close to that: the use of targeted and politically motivated criminal investigations against numerous publicly traded New York businesses and their employees. The so-called Martin Act allowed “lightweight” Schneiderman to launch such investigations without ever having to prove intent, knowledge of wrongdoing, or even evidence of fraud. He simply, with a Thanos-like snap of his fingers, brought the full weight of the New York “injustice” system upon any business he or his office deemed to be “bad guys” (oh, the irony).

No other piece of legislation in the 50 states, the federal government, or even in many modern Western democracies comes anywhere close to the level of power and discretion that New York’s Martin Act granted to Schneiderman.

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