The EU Is Waging War on What Makes the Internet Great

“Article 13 takes an unprecedented step towards the transformation of the Internet from an open platform for sharing and innovation, into a tool for the automated surveillance of its users.”

 

 

I’ve been using the Internet since 1992 or so. It’s more than just a part of my life. It is where I make my living. It is my main means of communication. It is an endless well of information. Sometimes still, after 25 years online (25!) I am taken by what an absolute miracle the Internet is.

But there are those who don’t like this miracle. Politicians are at the top of this list. The Internet has given the great unwashed a window into how things ACTUALLY work and some powerful people just despise that. John Kerry once remarked, not so long ago, how “this thing called the Internet” made it difficult to “govern.”

No Mr. Kerry it makes it difficult to RULE. And that is one reason Soros and other anti-speech people are attacking the Internet in Europe first. There are few speech protections there and there is definitely no equivilent to the 1st Amendment.

(From The AntiMedia)

What is it about the European Union and bad tech laws with boring names? Brussels has managed to transform four harmless letters into a byword for irritating compliance-induced spam and pop-ups, as well as a consolidation of power for the internet’s biggest players. Now that the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) dust has settled, along comes Article 13 of the Directive for Copyright in the Digital Single Market, which was approved Thursday by the European Parliament’s Committee on Legal Affairs…

…It is hard to overstate the extent of the threat this piece of legislation is to online culture as we know it. In an open letter to European Parliament President Antonio Tajani, a group of internet pioneers that includes Tim Berners-Lee, Vinton Cerf, and Jimmy Wales spell out the danger:

“Article 13 takes an unprecedented step towards the transformation of the Internet from an open platform for sharing and innovation, into a tool for the automated surveillance of its users.”

Article 13 essentially amounts to an outsourcing of copyright enforcement to internet companies and imposes a requirement to check everything posted online for copyright infringement. That will have grave consequences for both free expression and competition.

Click here for the article.