Twitter is the “bad faith actor,” Social justice warriors at the company shadow ban people they don’t like

Image: Screenshot – Project Veritas

 

We’ve known for a while that Twitter is actively censoring people they find abhorrent. The practice stinks. It flies in the face of the spirit of the Internet. But hey the social justice totalitarians are afraid to let any idea that lay outside of their limited and stunted worldview see the light of day.

Twitter is a private company and as such can do what it wants. But let’s not pretend like Twitter isn’t engaging in really horrible behavior.

(From The Daily Caller)

Republican Reps. Matt Gaetz of Florida, Mark Meadows of North Carolina and Jim Jordan of Ohio all had their visibility in searches suppressed, a Vice News investigation published Wednesday found. Democrats were not similarly affected by the change, Vice found.

Gadde and Beykpour, the two Twitter executives, on Thursday revealed three “signals” that Twitter uses to identify “bad-faith actors”:

  1. Specific account properties that indicate authenticity (e.g. whether you have a confirmed email address, how recently your account was created, whether you uploaded a profile image, etc)
  2. What actions you take on Twitter (e.g. who you follow, who you retweet, etc)
  3. How other accounts interact with you (e.g. who mutes you, who follows you, who retweets you, who blocks you, etc)

That third “signal” is what led Twitter’s algorithm to hide the visibility of the Republican accounts, which Twitter has since reversed.

The suppression of Republican congressmen’s accounts “had more to do with how other people were interacting with these representatives’ accounts than the accounts themselves,” Gadde and Beykpour wrote.

Twitter’s algorithm likely suppressed the Republican congressmen because the wrong accounts “engaged” with theirs, they said.

So if you have the wrong “friends” you a get the algorithm censorship treatment.

For the record we’ve assumed that AC2 News has gotten such treatment in the past.

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